Computing, Linux, system administration, Uncategorized

How to Install Java 8 on Debian GNU/Linux 9 (Stretch)

How to Install Java 8 on Debian GNU/Linux 9 (Stretch)

In this article, I will go through the process of installation of Java 8 on Debian 9 Stretch. Java comes in two flavors and we install both. OpenJDK is open source version that is compatible with most software.  And Oracle JavaSE is the proprietary version that should be used if your java application is incompatible with OpenJDK. […]

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Peace Prize Committee awards prize to Alfred Nobel


Oslo, October 12
— Earlier today, the Stortinget in Norway announced this year’s Nobel Peace Prize laureate. In a surprising move, they decided to award the prize to its long-dead founder, Alfred Nobel.

In recent decades, several of of the Peace Prize winners have been controversial, including Barack Obama, who received the prize two weeks into his presidency, and Mikhail Gorbatjov, who lead the Soviet Union through the end of its Communist era.


“It was really hard picking the prize this year”, the chairman of the committe, Olaf Ruskebus, says. “We already gave the prize to all the democracy champions of the world, and giving the prize to a world leader backfired twice. Finally, someone had a brilliant insight: If the Peace Prize is so important, surely the one most deserving of it, is the man who created it!”

When asked if he thinks this year’s prize will be controversial, he responds, “It’s always been controversial when a new breed of laureate is announced. Gandhi was controversial. And now is the first time we give the Prize to a dead person. Who knows who’ll get it next year?”

When asked about next year’s prize, Ruskebus says, “We have some very interesting candidates! We’ve received nominations both for The People of Earth, and for Peace Itself!”

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Review: Batman: The Dark Knight Rises

(spoiler-free)

In the third installment of Christopher Nolan’s Batman series, the inspiration seems to have been lost. The previous two films worked so well, not in small part due to the excellent character portrayls, but in this film, the characters lack depth and their actions are not well explained. This is a major blow to the film, becuase we need to go deep into the characters if we are going to believe that heroes dress up as bats to fight crime, or villains spread chaos around them for no good reason.

The plot quickly turns into a stereotypical comic book plot. There’s actually a pretty clever plot twist, but it falls flat because we’re not invested in the characters.

It’s an adequate film for a few hours of quailty entertainment, but not nearly as memorable as The Dark Knight.

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Review: John Carter (2012)

John Carter is based on Edgar Rice Burrough’s pulp hero by the same name, or more specifically, the novel A Princess of Mars. It’s a classic sword-and-sorcery tale with bare-chested heroes, beautiful princesses, monsters, natives, and evil conquerors – except that instead of taking place in the ancient past, the setting is Mars, and instead of magic and swords there’s science and alien technology.

The story revolves around civil war veteran John Carter (Taylor Kitsch) who’s transported to Mars by a mystic amulet. There, he meets the alien natives (the four-armed Tharks), and becomes involved in the fight between two cities populated with humans. He meets the princess of one of the cities, Dejah Toris (Lynn Collins), who is about to be forced to marry the opposing city’s leader to broker peace.

It’s not hard for anyone who’s ever seen an adventure film to guess how it ends, but the journey there is surprisingly pleasant. The story holds together all the way and is told with clarity and precision. The special effects are plenty, but are not allowed to take precedence over storytelling. The film manages to develop the main characters and give them distinctive personalities in a very short space. The film makers have also provided a framing device – the original novel’s writer (Burroughs) is also in the film, and learns the story from Carter’s diary, which allows for a twist ending.

The special effects render the alien species, architecture and vehicles very well, and it’s quite entertaining to see the titular character’s feats of superhuman strength, enabled by Mars’ lower gravity. The main characters also provide some eye candy, especially Carter/Kitsch, who runs around bare-chested for most of the film. Recommended for anyone who likes well-told action/adventure films.

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Review: The Chase (2012) by by Tomas Vergara

The Chase is a short, independent film about a hitman job gone wrong. The animation is technically very well done, with realistic physics and movement. There are many examples of falling, crumbling physical structures and human acrobatics, which makes the film seem more like a technological demo than a vessel for storytelling.

The storyline is simple and straight-forward, with little characterisation and no dialogue. The pacing feels flat – for example, the cuts are long even during the action-filled scenes, and there’s little sense of urgency.

I think the film is a good example of how much can be done by talented artists in their own homes using today’s technology.

Info:

Directed by Tomas Vergara
Characters by Mauricio Galvez
Music and SFX by Jay Taylor

Watch the film on Vimeo.